How your school can benefit from our programmes

As Ofsed recognises, effective careers provision and meaningful contact with employers is essential in ensuring positive future destinations for young people. We offer an important additional resource to support your students, and help you hit those Gatsby benchmarks.

If you are interested in working with us please do get in touch - abigail@werise.org.uk

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Abigail Melville
We Rise Youth Connect Blog Take Over!

How does university work?

What is UCAS

Ucas is the universities and colleges admissions service, which is based in the UK and main purpose is to operate the application process for British universities and HESA (higher education application processing). Young people who want to apply to study an undergraduate degree in the UK will have to apply through Ucas.

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Abigail Melville
We Rise Youth Connect Blog Take Over!

Is experience the only thing that matters when applying for jobs?

Many young people think that employers are only looking for individuals who have experience in the type of field of job and therefore may feel unqualified for the job. However, many employers find personal qualities, attitudes and ability to do the job more valuable when applying for jobs.

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Abigail Melville
We Rise Futures successful says independent evaluation

Lambeth Council’s independent external evaluation praised the We Rise team for their commitment, inspiration and willingness to learn. The evaluation found clear evidence that the programme has been successful. 96% of the students were found to have made progress along an 8 stage pathway. The report praised the engagement of employers. It highlights two big themes from the programme: its impact on increasing students confidence and the way it enabled them to explore and reconstruct their sense of self.

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How can employers communicate with Gen Z?

Gen Z is notorious for online multitasking and short attention spans. But the picture is more complicated. This generation is also serious and pragmatic. They want content that is authentic, engaging and informative. So how do you attract Gen Z to focus on your company and your opportunities? We have been talking to young people in South London about how they’d like to be communicated with. Here’s what they’ve told us…



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Abigail Melville
Post Office

The Post Office asked our team of young consultants to develop a social media presence and strategy for two local post office stores. They seconded three of their dynamic graduate trainees for a week to design a programme and coach our 17 year olds through the tasks.

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Abigail Melville
How can employers reach young talent from disadvantaged backgrounds?

Access to professional jobs remains overwhelmingly dominated by the children of professional parents who boost their kids chances through educational opportunities, unpaid internships and informal social networks. The Social Mobility Commission’s recommendations focus on boosting resources in education especially for 16-18 year olds. But what can employers do? And is it time to be a bit more radical?

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Abigail Melville
Are informal codes of behaviour, rather than ability, defining talent?

A new book exposes how class based cultural codes act as a barrier to diversity. On the day The Government’s Social Mobility Commission announced that class privilege remains entrenched in Britain and social mobility has stagnated, I attended a powerful presentation from Sam Friedman, Associate Professor of Sociology at the LSE and author of a new book The Class Ceiling, a searing analysis of how self perpetuating privilege works in the UK.

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Abigail Melville
How can your company reach diverse talent?

Do you find it hard to access and attract diverse talent for your apprenticeships?

Is your company failing to spend its apprenticeship levy on young people?

Are you finding it hard to hit company targets for diversity and inclusion?

Companies that are not making progress on diversity risk damaging their employer brand and looking out of touch with today’s customers.

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Abigail Melville